Daily Buddha

PEACEFUL WARRIOR POSE (VIPARITA VIRANHADRASANA)

Finding space is not always easy – sometimes you have to strive for it like a warrior. Standing steadily in Viparita Viranhasrasana, the sanskrit name for Peaceful Warrior Pose or Reverse Warrior Pose, your legs are spread apart with your front knee bent and your back foot fully rooted to the ground. Arch your torso back fully extending one arm and resting your other hand on your back leg. With your lower body leaning forward while your upper body leans back, you embody the physical process of give and take – of balance seeking. Finding peace often entails finding a balance the aggressive and receptive parts of ourselves. Be a warrior for peace. Be firm in your resolve and open to receive.

from Yoga 365, Daily Wisdom for Life, On and Off the Mat

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Daily Buddha

The Breath Invites Expansiveness

“With each inhale, our lungs fill and our rib cage expands gently outward and upward, similar to an umbrella stretching open. With each exhale, the umbrella in released, allowing us to relax. Because the breath literally expands our upper torso, it can create a feeling of expansiveness within us. This can make us feel more powerful, reminding us that we can always become more open and spacious in our lives simply by breathing. Several times throughout your day today, draw your attention to your breath, noticing whether the experience of your physical expansiveness invites you in to a more expansive sense of self.”

from Yoga 365, Daily Wisdom for Life, On and Off the Mat

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Yoga 365

Today’s Daily Buddha

Yoga is much more than the physical movement of our bodies on the yoga mats. Yoga also offers us insights into our motivations, our desires and the ways in which we think and feel about ourselves. We can broaden our experience of yoga by exploring yoga philosophy and mythology. This approach is called Jnana (NYAH-nah) Yoga. The Sanskrit word jnana means wisdom and jnana yoga means the yoga of wisdom. In our lives as yoga practitioners, we can cultivate an intelligence of both our bodies and our minds. Wisdom can be found in every corner, whether we are moving on our mats, practicing meditation on a cushion or reading ancient texts. Yoga is wisdom.

from…Yoga 365 – Daily Wisdom for Life on and off the Mat

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Today’s Daily Buddha


Buddha Statue Near Trees

“Each morning we are born again. What we do today matters is what matters the most” – Buddha

The sources which present a full and complete picture of the life of Siddhārtha Gautama are a variety of different, and sometimes conflicting, traditional biographies. These include the BuddhacaritaLalitavistara SūtraMahāvastu, and the Nidānakathā.  Of these, the Buddhacarita is the earliest full biography, an epic poem written by the poet Aśvaghoṣa in the first century CE. The Lalitavistara Sūtra is the next oldest biography, a Mahāyāna/Sarvāstivāda biography dating to the 3rd century CE. The Mahāvastu from the Mahāsāṃghika Lokottaravāda tradition is another major biography, composed incrementally until perhaps the 4th century CE. The Dharmaguptaka biography of the Buddha is the most exhaustive, and is entitled the Abhiniṣkramaṇa Sūtra, and various Chinese translations of this date between the 3rd and 6th century CE. The Nidānakathā is from the Theravada tradition in Sri Lanka and was composed in the 5th century by Buddhaghosa.

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Today’s Daily Buddha

Buddha Hand Statue

This is a saying from the Pali canon, upadhi dukkhassa mūlanti, which means “Attachment is the root of suffering.” So this is a genuine canonical quote.

You’ll find it in this sutta, but translated by Thanissaro as “Acquisition is the root of stress.” His translations are rather idiosyncratic.

In this translation of the same sutta it’s “acquisition is the root of suffering.”

Bhikkhu Bodhi’s translation (not available online, but in The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha, page 868) has “attachment is the root of suffering,” although he sometimes has “acquisition” in place of “attachment,” in various repetitions of the phrase.

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Basics of Zen Buddhism 

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The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali